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35+ Romeo and Juliet Quotes About Fate, Tragic and Sadness

6 810x506 - 35+ Romeo and Juliet Quotes About Fate, Tragic and Sadness

Romeo and Juliet quotes about fate show us how destiny can destroy love. From the beginning of the story, Romeo and Juliet are fated to be a tragedy. There are said to be ‘star crossed,’ even the stars opposed their love. Shakespeareans believe that fate is affected by the position of the stars. Maybe this is why Romeo and Juliet’s love story is doomed.

Many of the events in Romeo and Juliet made them missed chances. Romeo missed the opportunity to understand that Juliet drinks a potion only to fake her death. He killed himself after feeling a profound loss of his love. Juliet missed the chance to let Romeo know that she did not mean to suicide. In the end, she killed herself after Romeo died.

Romeo and Juliet Quotes About Fate

 “I fear, too early: for my mind misgives. Some consequence yet hanging in the stars. Shall bitterly begin his fearful date. With this night’s revels and expire the term. Of a despised life closed in my breast. By some vile forfeit of untimely death.”
– Romeo

 “O, I am fortune’s fool!”
– Romeo

 “I doubt it not; and all these woes shall serve. For sweet discourses in our time to come.”
– Romeo

 “Is it e’en so?—Then I defy you, stars!”
– Romeo

 “If I profane with my unworthiest hand. This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this:. My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand. To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.”
– Romeo

 “Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?”
– Romeo

 “O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do; They pray, grant thou, lest faith turn to despair.”
– Romeo

 “Then move not, while my prayer’s effect I take. Thus from my lips, by yours, my sin is purged.”
– Romeo

 “Sin from thy lips? O trespass sweetly urged! Give me my sin again.”
– Romeo

 “This love that thou hast shown. Doth add more grief to too much of mine own. Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs; Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes; Being vexed, a sea nourished with loving tears. What is it else? A madness most discreet, A choking gall, and a preserving sweet.”
– Romeo

 “I doubt it not; and all these woes shall serve. For sweet discourses in our time to come.”
– Romeo

 “One fairer than my love? the all-seeing sun. Ne’er saw her match since first the world begun.”
– Romeo

 “But soft! what light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun!—
Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she.”
– Romeo

 “See how she leans her cheek upon her hand, O that I were a glove upon that hand that I might touch that cheek!”
– Romeo

 “I take thee at thy word: Call me but love, and I’ll be new baptiz’d; Henceforth I never will be Romeo.”
– Romeo

 “Under love’s heavy burden do I sink.”
– Romeo

 “Eyes, look your last! Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss. A dateless bargain to engrossing death!—

Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide! Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!  Here’s to my love! [Drinks.]—O true apothecary! Thy drugs are quick.—Thus with a kiss I die.”
– Romeo

“I still will stay with thee. And never from this palace of dim night. Depart again. Here, here will I remain
With worms that are thy chambermaids. O, here.. Will I set up my everlasting rest. And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars. From this world-wearied flesh!”

– Romeo

“Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs; Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes; Being vex’d a sea nourish’d with lovers’ tears.”

– Romeo

“O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright.”

– Romeo

“See how she leans her cheek upon her hand! O that I were a glove upon that hand, That I might touch that cheek! “

– Romeo

“But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. “

– Romeo

“Tempt not a desperate man”

– Romeo

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet”

– Juliet

“O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo? Deny thy father and refuse thy name; Or if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love.. And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.”

– Juliet

“Good Night, Good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say good night till it be morrow.”

– Juliet

“Give me my Romeo, and, when I shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine.. That all the world will be in love with night. And pay no worship to the garish sun.“

– Juliet

“This bud of love, by summer’s ripening breath, May prove a beauteous flower when next we meet.”

– Juliet

“This is thy sheath [stabs herself]; there rest, and let me die.”

– Juliet

“And yet I wish but for the thing I have; My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep; the more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite.”

– Juliet

“O, swear not by the moon, th’ inconstant moon, That monthly changes in her circle orb, Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.”

– Juliet

“Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow, That I shall say good night till it be morrow.”

– Juliet

“See how she leans her cheek upon her hand, O that I were a glove upon that hand that I might touch that cheek!

– Juliet

“‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy. Thou art thyself, though not a Montague. What’s Montague? it is nor hand, nor foot, Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part.. Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose. By any other name would smell as sweet.”

– Juliet

“My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late! Prodigious birth of love it is to me, That I must love a loathed enemy.”

– Juliet

“O God, I have an ill-divining soul! Me thinks I see thee, now thou art below. As one dead in the bottom of a tomb: Either my eyesight fails, or thou look’st pale.”

– Juliet

“O fortune, fortune! all men call thee fickle: If thou art fickle, what dost thou with him. That is renown’d for faith? Be fickle, fortune; For then, I hope, thou wilt not keep him long, But send him back.”

During the plot of the story, Romeo already had a thought that fate was playing on him. He came to Capulets’ party, met the girl that he was falling in love to, only to know the fact that their love was forbidden. They were too young to control their feelings.

Up to now, people adore Romeo and Juliet quotes about fate because they often relate to real life. Many love stories should face the end so early. Most of them are played by the outcome, just as our beloved characters, Romeo and Juliet.

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